Tag Archives: final years

Stupidly busy? Be smart and manage your time effectively.

Sometimes it seems there just aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything done. With the competing demands of revising for exams, writing essays and applying for jobs, good management of your time is essential.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, consider if you are filling your time wisely. Are you putting off more challenging tasks by cleaning the house, doing the washing up, checking Facebook? My advice…..

Stop Procrastinating!

  1. Just start – do something (anything) to get the task under-way.
  2. If it’s big, break it down into smaller parts and do a little each day so you don’t feel so daunted by it.
  3. Do one thing at a time. Just because you can do ten things at once doesn’t mean you should. Focusing on one thing at a time means you’ll do better work, finish faster, and move on to other, more enjoyable activities.
  4. A cluttered desk is not helpful. Clear your desk of everything not related to what you are currently doing. This will help you concentrate and focus your attention.
  5. Identify your ‘prime time’. We all have a time of day when we are alert and attentive. The secret is to recognise when this is and do the tasks that require energy, concentration and thought when you’re at your sharpest.
  6. Plan ahead by creating a schedule including study, work, and your personal commitments for the next few months. Then…
  7. Prioritise: to be effective, you need to decide what tasks are urgent and important and focus on these. You’ll feel a real sense of achievement and satisfaction from ticking completed tasks off you list.
  8. Work in blocks of time: try a maximum of an hour before taking a 15min break, this way you’ll concentrate better.
  9. Minimise interruptions by switching off your phone, signing out of social media, turning off alerts and push notifications or asking friends not to disturb you. You can survive without knowing your friends’ latest status update for a few hours.
  10. Give yourself a reward once you complete a task to keep you motivated.

Some people believe they need the chaos of leaving things to the last minute and the pressure of a tight deadline to motivate them: ask yourself whether this is really effective or whether it’s disguised procrastination.

If you just do it now, you can look forward to some real leisure time later without the pressure of future work hanging over you. Breaking tasks down and scheduling work ahead of time also means you won’t get overwhelmed later on. It’s all about delayed gratification and you might actually find you produce better work under less stress.

Claire Wrixon
Careers Adviser

Just graduated?

The Careers Service is here to help!

UoB Graduation Ceremony

Have a great day!!

Well done on graduating!

For the first three years after graduation, you can continue to use the Careers Service for free. There are a number of ways you can do this:

  • If you are still in Bristol, or visiting then please call in and talk to any member of staff who will be happy to help you in any way they can
  • Outside of Bristol, make good use of the website and you will also see that there are a number of options available to you for getting help and advice

To access the website as a graduate you will need to activate your mycareer account.  You will shortly receive an email from us explaining what you will need to do.  Follow the instructions and you will be able to continue using the website as if you were still a current student.  You will, however, find that some applications are not available to you as a graduate, as these must be restricted to current students only.

On the website you will find there is a whole section dedicated to you as a graduate and here you will see the range of resources available, for example, advice about: funding, further study, different occupations, CVs and applications, vacancies and many, many more resources.  Do have a look and explore all that is there!

If you feel it would be good to speak to someone, then please call into the Careers Service, if you are still in Bristol or alternatively you can phone us and we will be happy to help you.  If after talking to a member of staff at the Welcome Desk it is felt an appointment with an Adviser would be useful then this can be arranged there and then.  All appointments are 15 minutes long and it will help you and the adviser if you can do as much preparation before your appointment so that you get the best result from your time with them.   We also have a team of Information Specialists who can give you tips about researching sectors and individual employers and point out the best resources.

We are always here to help and we all wish you the best of luck for the future.

Trudy Mardon
Information Assistant

Image: © University of Bristol

So you got a 2:2 – what happens next?

 

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It’s the time of year when degree results are announced and, amid all the celebrations, there are some of you for whom things may not have gone according to plan.  There seems to be a lot of pressure on students to achieve a 2:1 these days, but this is really only significant if you are aiming to secure a position on a graduate scheme, as recruiters often use degree classifications to screen the vast numbers of applications they receive.

According to data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), the percentages for those in full-time employment six months after graduation are actually the same for those with Firsts, 2:1s and 2:2s, so things do have a tendency to equalise over time.  Please do bear in mind that only a minority of graduates end up on these large grad schemes each year, so it’s important to take a deep breath and consider your options – of which there are many.  We also recommend taking a look at our previous post What If I Don’t Want a Graduate Scheme? to help you work out what your next step might be.

Some graduate schemes do accept 2:2s

You may be surprised to know that not all graduate schemes require a 2:1 for you to be able to apply.  Some engineering and accounting firms (not the Big Four) will accept a 2:2, and some well-known schemes run by HMRC, the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) and the NHS are all still open to you.  Many firms will also consider applicants with a 2:2 if you contact them to explain any genuinely mitigating circumstances in advance of submitting your application; this will also avoid your being screened out by computer before you have had a chance to explain your situation.

Work your way up & gain experience

You can also prove you have the skills to do the job by taking on a graduate internship or placement.  This offers hands-on experience which will look great on your CV, as well as offering an opportunity to impress while actually doing the work; many internships can work as extended interviews.  Search company websites to see what’s on offer (internships are advertised throughout the year) and try our UoB Internship Scheme, which is open to graduates.  You can find opportunities advertised on the Careers Service website or find your own and talk to us about funding.

Work for a small business

Working for a small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) or a start-up could be the perfect way to get your career moving.  Small businesses place the emphasis on skills and work experience when recruiting as they need you to be able to make a contribution straight away and hit the ground running.  Some SMEs advertise with the Careers Service but you should also do your own research, make a shortlist and start calling them directly about what could be available.  These working environments may not offer structured training but you’ll have much earlier responsibility than in a grad scheme, if you can prove the quality of your work, and you will feel as if you are making a difference from the outset.

Think carefully about opting for a Masters

Many graduates immediately start applying for a Masters in the hope that attaining a higher degree will negate having a 2:2.  However, most recruiters will still use your undergraduate degree result for screening if you apply for a graduate scheme, even if you have bagged yourself a Masters.  If you’re thinking about taking the postgraduate study route, talk to the employers you’re interested in working for to find out which specific courses they might view as an enhancement to your profile.  A Masters degree does not necessarily make you more employable in the way that relevant work experience can, so do your homework before making an expensive mistake and taking another year out of the labour market.

What do you really want to do?

Sometimes, not getting what you want offers an important opportunity to take a step back and reflect on other possibilities.  There is a whole world of work out there that doesn’t require a 2:1 and a training scheme.  Come in and talk to a Careers Adviser about what you can do with your skills, what you enjoy and what your next steps could be; there are more job roles out there than you can possibly imagine.  You may decide to work for yourself, take a year out, travel or gain valuable experience before you throw yourself back into the graduate labour market and try again.  Just remember that there are many ways in which you can add value to your CV and impress a potential employer without the magic 2:1 on your transcript.

Dr Tracy Johnson, Careers Adviser

Image: http://www.gothinkbig.co.uk/features/

The myths surrounding postgraduate study

Recently, with other members of the AGCAS (Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services) postgraduate task group, I’ve been conducting research to explore some of the myths surrounding postgraduate study.  With widespread media perception of a depressed graduate market and a devalued first degree it is understandable that many students embark on postgraduate study in the hope that it will offer them a competitive advantage when applying for jobs.  I’ve interviewed some of our graduate recruiters to see if they agree.

Do employers have a separate entry point for postgraduates?

One of the first questions asked was about separate entry points for postgraduates.  I know that this is of real significance to some postgraduates, after a Masters and a three or four year PhD you don’t necessarily want to apply for something that you feel you could have applied for four or five years before.  The reality is that there are very few employers who offer specific entry points for those with postgraduate qualifications, unless you have significant work experience and can therefore be considered as ‘experienced hire’.  I think it’s important to consider the additional skills that you have gained from postgraduate study and how you will sell these to an employer.  You will no doubt find that your application is far more competitive than it would have been a few years ago.  Although a postgraduate qualification may not be recognised in the application process, one graduate recruiter did tell us that, ‘being able to draw upon a wider range of experiences during the recruitment process can only strengthen a candidate’s application’, whilst another said that he, ‘would expect someone with a PhD to bring something additional to the table and expect to give them more responsibility more quickly given their additional experience’.

Do postgraduate students get paid more?

For many, postgraduate study is a significant financial investment, so it’s not surprising that you expect to be paid more.  Salaries vary widely depending on the company, the role and the organisation. It is unlikely that your postgraduate qualification alone will command a higher salary, although there are exceptions.  One recruiter told us that ‘salaries are determined by the particular role and location, not the candidate or their education’.

Are there any advantages to employing postgraduates?

We asked employers if they saw any advantages to employing postgraduates over those graduating with a first degree.  Most employers do recognise that postgraduates, particularly those that have undertaken research, may offer a ‘broader toolkit’ of skills, but the qualification itself is not enough.  Those with postgraduate qualifications are expected to be given responsibility faster and achieve promotion faster, but one employer stated that, ‘once you start a job the question is whether you can do that job well or not’.  Another told us that, ‘other than a 2:1 degree classification, experience in related work fields to the area applied for is seen as more valuable than further education’.

Does a postgraduate qualification make up for not having a 2:1?

Finally, I see many examples where graduates have embarked on a Masters degree to compensate for a poor first degree.  So, how did the employers respond to this?  Unfortunately, most of the graduate recruiters that we spoke to do have a minimum entry requirement of a 2:1.  There are some employers that will accept applications below this entry requirement, but only with evidence of extenuating or mitigating circumstances.  One of our recruiters commented that, ‘we will accept applications from people who do not meet our academic requirements provided that there is a strong justification for why we should consider the application’.  One example of this maybe significant and related professional work experience.

So, why do postgraduate study?

This small study has highlighted an ambiguous reaction to postgraduates in the job market.  If you’re thinking about postgraduate study I think it’s important to be clear about your motivations.  A passion for your subject and a desire to further your knowledge should be high on your list.  It maybe that the qualification is essential for your future career, but if not, then there are no guarantees of improving your employability.  Of equal importance is taking advantage of developing new skills and more importantly being able to articulate these skills to an employer.  Your breadth of examples could offer you a real competitive edge in the application process, but don’t assume that the employer knows what you’ve been doing for the last four years – you need to tell them!  Work experience is also key, with PhD internships becoming ever more popular.  To be competitive think about the package that you’re offering:  academic excellence, skills and experience.

The original article will appear in the next edition of Phoenix (AGCAS), October 2012.

Dr Samantha Cathro, Postgraduate Careers Adviser

Thinking Ahead

Job searching starts earlier these days…

I think it’s fitting that one of the first posts here is inspired by another Careers Service blog! The excellent Manchester Graduate Careers Blog gave me food for thought last week as I read Holly’s post on how employers are opening their applications for 2013 start already .

This reminded me how employers’ timetables are sometimes not in line with the university calendar, and whilst penultimate students are just breathing a sigh of relief that their exams are over, employers are gearing up to recruit them for their graduate schemes.

We know that some students are aware of this- a recent report stated that 42% of students last year had applied for a job before the end of October  and for students with an interest in banking early applications have always been essential.

However, for those who are still in the mindset “Hey, I’ll start in November”, it could mean that some of the opportunities have closed– this excellent timeline created last year demonstrates how a lot of the Times Top 100 employers such as the Civil Service Fast Stream, Teach First and McKinsey close their application process 4 weeks into the Autumn Term. That’s why our Careers Fairs are so early in the Autumn Term.

Scanning through the 450+ jobs posted on the UoB Careers Service website right now, you certainly see  this trend for early advertising with some of the employers that Holly mentions already posted for 2013, such as the Tesco Procurement Graduate Programme. What’s more, Unilever, who were delivering a case study session last week at our Science Faculty Careers Day, mentioned that they will open applications in August.

However, the vacancies advertised now also give the reassurance that employers are still recruiting now  for an immediate start. This of course reflects the huge diversity in the jobs market, with a lot of smaller employers recruiting much later, and also the fact that the larger employers recruit all year round, or are still recruiting because they haven’t found the right people to fill their roles.

So, when faced with the negativity media about how students graduating in 2012 or even 2013 are doomed, here are a few key things to remember:

1)      Research your employers– make sure that you know when they are opening their recruitment for internships or graduate places. Our ‘How to research employers’ pages are a good place to start.

2)      Don’t underestimate how long application forms can take to put together– make sure you give yourself time to get it checked and double checked.

3)      The Careers Service is  open all summer, and if you’re not in Bristol, contact us via e-mail and phone.

Sara Whittam, Careers Adviser